Bard College ART HISTORY PROGRAM

Student Opportunities

Curatorial Internship for Museum Diversity at the MFA, Boston

Exciting summer internship  at the MFA Boston. Funded by the Henry Luce Foundation, this paid internship for museum diversity will give a current college student or recent graduate the opportunity to assist with research, interpretation, and programming for a forthcoming exhibition on the collecting and display of American paintings from the 1940s and 1950s here at the MFA. The position is full time from May 29 through August 10. Please contact Zoë Samels (zsamels@mfa.org) with any questions.

Internships and application instructions can be found here:

https://www.mfa.org/search?search_api_views_fulltext=mfa+internships

Faculty News

Alex Kitnick will discuss Donald Judd’s Early Paintings

Monday, March 19
6:00pm
Crowley Theater

Please join Judd Foundation and Marfa Book Co. for a discussion with art historian Alex Kitnick. Kitnick will discuss Donald Judd’s early paintings installed in the Cobb House and Whyte Building, as well as the works from 1959–1961 that will be on display in “Donald Judd: Paintings” at the ICA Miami

April 5–July 15, 2018.

 

 

Faculty News

ALEX KITNICK IN CONVERSATION

GBE

NEWSLETTER, JANUARY 31, 2018
UPCOMING EVENTS

LATOYA RUBY FRAZIER 

IN CONVERSATION: THE LEGACY OF NOAH PURIFOY 
WITH ABIGAIL DEVILLE, ALEX KITNICK, 
AND YAEL LIPSCHUTZ
 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3 
3 PM 

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
439 WEST 127TH STREET 
NEW YORK, NY 10027 

Happenings at Bard

Joseph Salvatore Ackley will lecture

Silver Faces in Late Medieval Sculpture: Just How Charismatic, Just How Lifelike?

St. Christopher, c.1375-1425, French, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sculpture and painting in the late Middle Ages tends to be written as a narrative of increasing verisimilitude and lifelikeness – and indeed, when played out across paint and wood, the naturalistic representation of human presence (charismatic, bodily, idealized, and gruesome alike) appears paramount. This trajectory, however, becomes complicated when examining figural sculpture in gold and silver: How did these media, cast for centuries as vehicles of heavenly light and otherworldly irruption into the mundane, participate in late medieval practices of mimetic representation, particularly when figuring the human body? In considering figural mimesis in northern Europe during the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, do we detect a competitive antagonism or a fertile codependence between faces rendered with paint and faces rendered with metal? Considering the place of gold and silver in Gothic and early Renaissance sculpture serves to expand our sense of the pictorial priorities of this pivotal transitional period, and it also sets up a retrospective glance at earlier medieval centuries, thereby offering another approach to the ceaselessly complicated question of material, mimesis, and meaning in medieval art.

Thursday, November 2, 2017
5:00 pm, Weis Cinema

sponsored by the Art History Program

Faculty News

Contemporary Chinese Dissident Art

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
The Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

proudly presents the exhibition

I have no enemies and no hatred

Contemporary Chinese Dissident Art

Curated by Patricia Karetzky and SHU Yang

September 7, 2017 – November 3, 2017

Exhibition Opening Reception:
September 6, 2017, from 5:30 – 8:00 PM

This exhibit presents the work of some of the most dedicated Chinese contemporary artists who explore in their works the issue of human rights in China, focusing on such issues as democracy, homelessness, corruption, prostitution, unwarranted incarceration, and appropriation of public resources for private benefit and more. Using a variety of media – painting, photographs, documentary video, sculpture, installation and music – they present the normal circumstances of life in China where human rights are commonly abused. Compared to the high-speed development of the economy promoted by the Chinese government, human rights have been delayed in this social political system that caused intense conflict in Chinese society. Even the basic rights for modern society are challenged.

Artists are not only living but also watching and showing the social condition. Thus, artists encounter the limitations of free expression in their art and normally confront problems of social rights. So the nature of an artists’ work relates both to his society and to his intent to convey its problems through his art. When an artist examines social rights, his work always is a record and presentation of society’s injustices. When art protects social rights, it lasts longer, for the art works provide cultural understanding. In the end, such art works rise above social interests and present the issues and different cultural value systems.

~ SHU Yang

Exhibited artists: CCD Workstation, CHEN Longbin, GAO Brothers, GAO Yuan, LEI Zhang, LI Xinmo, LU Feifei, LUI Wei, MA Yangling, TSAI Wenxiang, WANG Qingsong, WU Yuren, XU Ruotao, XU Yong, YANG Jinsong, ZHANG O, ZUOXIAO Zuzhou

Faculty News

Susan Aberth New Publication

I spent a wonderful time two years ago interviewing this artist in Bogota, Colombia and now the book is finally out. I am proud to have a chapter in it!

Faculty News

Susan Aberth Curates Masonic Relic Room

Professor Susan Aberth curated the Masonic Relic Room for the newly opened Marciano Foundation Museum in Los Angeles on Wilshire Blvd. The beautiful building by Millard Sheets was once a Scottish Rite Temple and now houses the Marciano Bros. contemporary art collection. Admission is free but by appointment only. Read more in the New Yorker:

 

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/05/29/the-guess-brothers-masonic-temple

Alumni

Angelo Aponte, Class of 2006

Bard College Art History graduate Angelo Aponte spoke on Tuesday April 26 on his experiences as a Freemason and Worshipful Master in Secaucus Hudson Lodge #72 in New Jersey in Prof. Susan Aberth’s course, What is Freemasonry?  

Student News

Open Space Institute, Inc. Barnabas McHenry Award given to Miranda Fe Whitus

Congratulations! Miranda Fey Whitus and her project, Tracing the Lineage of Historic Families of the Hudson Valley Through Collection Materials, is a 2017 McHenry Award winner in the Historic Preservation category for her proposal for Montgomery Place.

The Advisory Committee selected Miranda Fey Whitus because of her exceptional leadership abilities and the quality of the project that she is going to work on.

Happenings at Bard

Before the Arab Revolutions: Art, Dissent, and Diplomacy in Amman, Beirut, and Ramallah

Rabih Mroue and Lina Saneh, “Biokraphia” (2002) Courtesy of Askhal Alwan

Hanan Toukan
Brown University

Monday, April 3, 2017
6:30 p.m.
Olin, Room 102

This talk is about the relationship between contemporary art, dissent, cultural diplomacy and cultural politics in the Arab Middle East. Since the start of the Arab revolutionary process and the violence that has accompanied it, the culture and arts domain has come to play an ever more crucial role as mobilizer, witness, and archivist of historical events. As a result the domain has enjoyed an exponential growth in the technical and financial support it receives from US and EU funding bodies. This growth has provoked intense debates within policy circles and a plethora of academic literature on what the role of visual and cultural practices are and should be in violent warfare, political change, and the study of politics and culture in the region.

This talk will historicize and contextualize this phenomenon as its focus predates 2011 and grapples with it from its first appearance in the 1990s and until its consolidation in the aftermath of 9/11. Specifically the talk examines the ways in which transnational circuits of visual cultural production are related to how society makes, sees and experiences the political in art and its relevance to the wider publics in Jordan, Lebanon and the Occupied Palestinian Territories. I address prevalent debates about the nature of the political in art as well as the role of art and the intellectual in political change. It shows that both are part and parcel of shifting structural dynamics in local and international politics that directly impact the production of culture and how different generations practice them, perceive them and process them. Hence this talk is not is not so much about “art”, as much as it is about the “artworld” from a local perspective, and how culture in it is produced in a global world. It is equally about some of the centers of power that fund and disseminate visual knowledge about the Middle East.

Hanan Toukan is Visiting Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture and Middle East Studies at Brown University.
This event is co-sponsored by the Human Rights Project and the Art History program
For more information: contact Dina Ramadan at 845-758-6822, or e-mail dramadan@bard.edu.

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