Bard College ART HISTORY and VISUAL CULTURE PROGRAM

Notes from the Chair

A Lecture by Rachel Himes

 

Rachel Himes will speak about her experience as a museum education specialist at the Frick Museum in New York City.

November 13, 2018
RKC 103
Reception at 5:00, lecture at 5:30

 

Faculty News

Artists in New York: The Virtual Asian American Art Museum

Tom Wolf, Bard College, will speak:  5:15 p.m. Panel 1: An Asian American Modern in New York

For more information:   http://apa.nyu.edu/event/artists-in-new-york-the-virtual-asian-american-art-museum/

Notes from the Chair

“Weightier than Mount Tai, Lighter than a Feather: Human Rights Experience of Chinese Contemporary Art”

Prof. Patricia Eichenbaum Karetzky, the O Munsterberg Chair of Asian Art at Bard college presents her exhibition “Weightier than Mount Tai, Lighter than a Feather: Human Rights Experience of Chinese Contemporary Art” at the Bard Campus Center, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY. Please come to the opening reception on Saturday October 13, noon-3:00 pm. There is a free catalogue that accompanies the exhibition.

Student News

A Painting Exhibition by Conghao Tian

Conghao Tian ’19, will exhibit his paintings, Symbol of Eternity: The Monumental Landscape,  October 5-11, 2018 at the Mid-Hudson Heritage Center.

Opening Reception, October 5th 4-7

Uncategorized

Sound modernities: histories of media and modern architecture

Congratulations to Olga Touloumi, Bard College, Art History and Sabine von Fischer

on the publication of the Introduction to  Sound modernities: history of media and modern architecture in The Journal of Architecture, Vol. 23, 2018
Issure 6: Sound Modernities: Histories of Media and Modern Architecture

“This set of essays tries to broaden scholarship on acoustics and architecture by investigating how architects and buildings dealt with sound at large. Our brilliant contributors – Jack Quinan, Gretta Tritch Roman, Michael Windover, Sandra Jasper, David Theodore, Carlotta Daro, Shundana Yusaf, put forward an interesting array of building programs to consider while investigating acoustic cultures: radio stations, prairie houses, libraries, hospitals, stock exchanges, wastelands, assembly halls, as well as concert halls and prairie houses, all made it in the issue. This special issue has been a long time in the making and we are extremely thankful to the Society of Architectural Historians and Ken Oshima for offering the initial platform for our panel in 2014; Viktoria Tkaczyk and the research group Epistemes of the Modern Acoustics at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science for hosting our workshop and allowing us to expand the scope in 2016; and the editor-in-chief Charles Rice of the Journal of Architecture for trusting and publishing this work.”   Olga Touloumi

Faculty News

Social Fabric: Thomas Bayrle’s Expanded Network

 

Thomas Bayrle, Bierrakete [Beer Rocket], 1969. Silkscreen print on cardboard, 18 1/8 × 16 1/2 in (46 × 42 cm). Edition of 15. Photo: Wolfgang Günzel

Bringing together a new generation of artists interested in Thomas Bayrle’s legacy, this panel will look at how younger voices take up questions around corporate production, political spectacle, digital technology, and urban planning in their own work. The conversation will be moderated by art historian and critic Alex Kitnick, and will feature panelists Lena Henke, Jacolby Satterwhite, and Jordan Wolfson.

The panel is organized on the occasion of “Thomas Bayrle: Playtime,” the first major New York museum survey of Thomas Bayrle (b. 1937, Berlin, Germany). Bayrle is one of the most important artists to have emerged during the West German economic boom in the 1960s, and has received belated recognition for his influential works and processes. Long before the advent of current visual technologies, he foresaw our digital reality, employing photocopy machines and other midcentury tools in his early works to create analog visualizations of what we now understand as digital culture. Bayrle’s thematic investigations have ranged from a visual analysis of mass culture and consumerism to reflections on how technology impacts global politics. This comprehensive survey will bring together over 115 works, including paintings, sculptures, drawings, wallpapers and prints, early computer-based art, videos, and films.

Sponsors
This program is made possible, in part, by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Student Opportunities

Curatorial Internship for Museum Diversity at the MFA, Boston

Exciting summer internship  at the MFA Boston. Funded by the Henry Luce Foundation, this paid internship for museum diversity will give a current college student or recent graduate the opportunity to assist with research, interpretation, and programming for a forthcoming exhibition on the collecting and display of American paintings from the 1940s and 1950s here at the MFA. The position is full time from May 29 through August 10. Please contact Zoë Samels (zsamels@mfa.org) with any questions.

Internships and application instructions can be found here:

https://www.mfa.org/search?search_api_views_fulltext=mfa+internships

Faculty News

Alex Kitnick will discuss Donald Judd’s Early Paintings

Monday, March 19
6:00pm
Crowley Theater

Please join Judd Foundation and Marfa Book Co. for a discussion with art historian Alex Kitnick. Kitnick will discuss Donald Judd’s early paintings installed in the Cobb House and Whyte Building, as well as the works from 1959–1961 that will be on display in “Donald Judd: Paintings” at the ICA Miami

April 5–July 15, 2018.

 

 

Faculty News

ALEX KITNICK IN CONVERSATION

GBE

NEWSLETTER, JANUARY 31, 2018
UPCOMING EVENTS

LATOYA RUBY FRAZIER 

IN CONVERSATION: THE LEGACY OF NOAH PURIFOY 
WITH ABIGAIL DEVILLE, ALEX KITNICK, 
AND YAEL LIPSCHUTZ
 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3 
3 PM 

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
439 WEST 127TH STREET 
NEW YORK, NY 10027 

Happenings at Bard

Joseph Salvatore Ackley will lecture

Silver Faces in Late Medieval Sculpture: Just How Charismatic, Just How Lifelike?

St. Christopher, c.1375-1425, French, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sculpture and painting in the late Middle Ages tends to be written as a narrative of increasing verisimilitude and lifelikeness – and indeed, when played out across paint and wood, the naturalistic representation of human presence (charismatic, bodily, idealized, and gruesome alike) appears paramount. This trajectory, however, becomes complicated when examining figural sculpture in gold and silver: How did these media, cast for centuries as vehicles of heavenly light and otherworldly irruption into the mundane, participate in late medieval practices of mimetic representation, particularly when figuring the human body? In considering figural mimesis in northern Europe during the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, do we detect a competitive antagonism or a fertile codependence between faces rendered with paint and faces rendered with metal? Considering the place of gold and silver in Gothic and early Renaissance sculpture serves to expand our sense of the pictorial priorities of this pivotal transitional period, and it also sets up a retrospective glance at earlier medieval centuries, thereby offering another approach to the ceaselessly complicated question of material, mimesis, and meaning in medieval art.

Thursday, November 2, 2017
5:00 pm, Weis Cinema

sponsored by the Art History Program

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