Bard College ART HISTORY PROGRAM

Posts from the 'Notes from the Chair' Category

Notes from the Chair

“Producing the Prison: A Spatial History of Prisoners in Colonial India”

Mira Rai Waits
University of California, Santa Barbara

“Producing the Prison: A Spatial History of Prisoners in Colonial India”

IOR/X/104/1-53, plate 28Nineteenth- and twentieth- century histories of prisons in British India have followed three narratives. British imperial history presented prisons as exceptional infrastructural improvements essential to governance. In Indian nationalist history, prisons became synonymous with British rule and incarceration was determined to be a necessary stage of Indian resistance. Recent scholarship has emphasized the legal and ideological origin of the prison as well as the significance of medical practice. When examined as a whole, this body of material can provide valuable insights into the colonial Indian prison. However these histories fail to investigate the prison in terms of design, representation, physical space, and material experience, reducing the prison to a static concept—a site of pure ideology. This talk demonstrates that the prison was not a historical given, but rather a space continually altered, re-imagined, and even challenged by the people and objects experiencing, recording, and narrating its production. This paper advocates the recognition of space as an active and dynamic component of the history of Indian prisons.

Thursday, March 12, 2015
12:00 noon
Olin 102

Notes from the Chair

Leonora Carrington: Invitation, Invocation and Manifestation

Warburg

Saturday, October 25, 2014
2pm – 3pm

Leonora Carrington: Invitation, Invocation and Manifestation
Prof. Susan Aberth (Bard College)

From her first widely exhibited work, Inn of the Dawn Horse (Self Portrait), executed while only twenty-one in 1938, the artist Leonora Carrington used the act of painting to invoke and harness unseen forces. Through the depiction of communion with and between animals, the presentation of altars containing ritual sacrifices, or the drawing of magic circles and other geometric patterns, Carrington’s work often serves as a perpetual summoning of the divine to manifest. Celtic goddesses, spirits of the departed, the Sidhe of the Tuatha Dé Danann, and other chthonic and ancient entities are called forth to serve unknown purposes or perhaps simply to demonstrate their continued existence and intervention in our supposedly secular times. This talk will focus on works in various media that best illustrate this aspect of Carrington’s oeuvre.

Notes from the Chair

Majors’ Event

index

Cindy Sherman

The Art History Program will hold its Majors’ Event on Wednesday, November 5th in the Faculty Dining Room.  Art History faculty will meet with majors and interested students to discuss the Spring 2015 course offerings.  Three alumni will speak of their lives after Bard, their failures and successes, giving tips and networking advise to current students.

Refreshments will be served.

Notes from the Chair

Senior Project Presentations 2013

Art History Senior Presentations Thursday, May 16th: art history seniors presented their projects to their peers and faculty and then participated in a celebratory dinner.

Here is the Program, please enjoy!

Notes from the Chair, Uncategorized

Medievalist Candidate

Candidate for the tenure-track Medieval Position in Art History

Beatrice Kitzinger
Stanford University

will give a talk:
“Manuscript Space and the Material Cross in the Late Eighteenth Century”

Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Reem Kayden Science Bldg. 102
6:00 pm

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean and the Art History Program

Notes from the Chair

Medievalist Candidate

Candidate for the tenure-track Medieval Position in Art History

Christopher R. Lakey
John Hopkins University
will give a talk:
“On the aspect of things: The Relief-Image and the Paradox of Perspective in the Middle Ages”

St. George Killing the Dragon, Cathedral of St. George, Ferrara (1135)

St. George Killing the Dragon, Cathedral of St. George, Ferrara (1135)

Thursday, March 14, 2013
Reem Kayden Science Bldg. 102
6:00 pm

Sponsored by the Dean of the College and the Art History Program

Notes from the Chair

Medievalist Candidate

 

Candidate for the tenure-track
Medieval Position in Art History

K A T H E R I N E   M.  B O I V I N

University of Montreal
will give a presentation:

Passing Below to Rise Above:
Medieval Church Passageways as Dynamic Interface

St. Jakob in Rothenburg ob der Tauber.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013
Reem Kayden Science Bldg. 102
6:00 pm
Sponsored by the Dean of the College and the Art History Program

Notes from the Chair

Collegiate Journal of Art

CJA

The Collegiate Journal of Art, the nation’s only undergraduate publication devoted to art history, has published its seventh edition and we have two copies in the office for you to peruse. Published at Dartmouth College, the journal looks to showcase essays that represent a cross section of the mammoth entity that is art history.   Please drop in and take a look.  CJA invites submissions for future issues – why don’t you think about it!   the.collegiate.journal.of.art@dartmouth.edu

Notes from the Chair

New Art History Course Offering Fall 2011

ArtH 264 Islam from Spain to Russia and China: Art, Philosophy, and Politics in the Medieval World

Mosque, Cordoba, Spain

Ali Humayun Akhtar
T Th 4:40-6:00 PM

This course examines the encounter of Islam with cultures and civilizations from Spain to Russia and China 800-1750 by exploring the  history of art, architecture, and material culture. The course examines specifically the political and philosophical dimensions of Islamic art in the pre-modern world in order to analyze more closely  categories like the “West,” the “Middle East,” and the “Far East.” To what extent does the art and politics of the pre-modern world allow us to define these geographic categories as distinct cultural regions with clear intellectual borders? Can we consider additional models of historiography that extend beyond paradigms like “The West and the Islamic World” or “Imperial Russia and the Islamic World”? How does our understanding of these paradigms change when we think in terms of  “trans-Mediterranean” and “trans-Caspian” artistic and political exchange?

This course fulfills the Ancient through Medieval requirement or the non-Western requirement. Art History students who are interested should contact Professor Akhtar immediately by e-mail.

Notes from the Chair

Art History Senior Presentations

On May 12th, the art history seniors (Class of 2011) gave their project presentations in Olin 102, followed by a celebratory dinner in the Faculty Dining Room.  Daniel Peacock, shown below delivering his presentation, received the Alexander Klebanoff Award for Outstanding Achievement in Art History.  This award is given annually to a senior project that demonstrates extensive scholarship and daring originality.  The title of this excellent project is Strange and Wayward Fancies: Desire, Vision, and Intervention in the Photographic Practice of F. Holland Day.

Daniel Peacock presenting

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